Friday, June 21, 2013

Vintage Decorating with Max Factor!

For the last few months I have been trying to figure out ways to spruce up what little space I have in my apartment to make it more glamorous and reminiscent of old Hollywood.

Ever since I took a tour of the Max Factor Museum, located in the heart of Hollywood, I became fascinated with the style of advertising Mr. Factor utilized mainly in the 40's and 50's using Hollywood starlets to endorse his numerous products in an attempt to coax young girls in the drug stores into buying his wonderful line of cosmetics.
 

The Max Factor Salon back in its heyday

Upon touring the facility, I noticed how there were four main rooms where Mr. Factor would work on his clients according to which hair color she had. Looking around I noticed dozens of actresses faces framed on the walls and realized that these were not pictures of them but actual magazine advertisements!

I immediately became completely enamored with these beautifully drawn ads that decorated the many rooms where the man himself would cut, color, and make over many of the starlets of that time from Lucille Ball to Elizabeth Taylor and even Judy Garland.

As I loomed around each salon room, adequately named according to the four different types of hair color, that is when it dawned on me. I immediately realized that I too could decorate my house with these fabulous prints so thus started my quest to begin collecting some of these ads to decorate my own dressing room i.e. bathroom walls with!


The Blonde Room where Marylin Monroe got her locks lightened often

 The Brunette Room, Elizabeth Taylor's go to destination

In the Blonde room, pictured above, you can see many of the ads that line the walls displaying the different actresses over the years who actually used not only the line of cosmetics but took advantage of the full salon services as well.


An example of how these gorgeous ads can adorn any wall

I could go on and on about how wonderful this time capsule of a museum is but let me not digress because I want to also show some of the hundreds of beautiful ads developed for Max Factor, any of which can add a bit of glamor to your bathroom or dressing room at home.
The lovely Ms. Lana Turner, one of several I personally own


What is even more fun about these adverts is that some would contain little diagrams or pictures displaying either how to apply the make up or the different varieties the colors would come in and how they would look on women with the four main types of hair color.

They just don't make ads like this anymore!
  
The only tricky thing about these ads is that they appeared in the old LOOK and other magazines of the time which had taller and wider dimensions then magazines of today. So you will definitely have to obtain your prints first before you actually start purchasing frames since some of these ads ran two pages and require a tall and long frame.

Two page advert from LOOK magazine

I think these prints are definitely a great addition for anyone looking to add a nice vintage touch to any room in the home as well as showing appreciation for some serious hand drawn art work which has truly become a thing of the past.

In my search for these adverts, I have been able to find my growing collection on eBay, however, there may be some sellers at any vintage textiles expo in your area that have a few for sale. 

Even though these are just old advertisement pages of the past, I feel like they still have a lot of awe to offer anyone who is privileged to see these amazing works of art in person. I believe these are truly relics of the past that can not only add as great decorative pieces but also help surround yourself is what it is to truly look and feel beautiful!


Besides, what could be more vintage then a Hollywood starlet of yesteryear gracefully poised on your wall reminding you that glamor should be and is the best part of every woman!


Me and the lovely Ms. Claudette Colbert!


Happy Decorating!
XOXO
-M


Max Factor Museum
1660 N Highland Ave
Hollywood, CA 90028 
 http://www.thehollywoodmuseum.com

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